Hotels Gran Hotel Ingles

Madrid, Spain

Luxury Travel Redefined


Andrew Harper Travel Benefits

  • 100 USD Food & Beverage credit
  • Complimentary continental breakfast for two daily
  • Early check-in and late check-out upon availability
  • Guaranteed upgrade at time of booking, subject to availability
  • Complimentary Wi-Fi

About Gran Hotel Ingles

A few blocks down Puerta del Sol, in the heart of the Barrio de Las Letras (literary quarters) is one of Madrid's oldest luxury hotels, the Gran Hotel Inglés. As a member of the prestigious Leading Hotels of the World, it re-opened its doors earlier in March of 2018. The boutique hotel has 48 well-designed art-deco styled rooms, an haute cuisine restaurant, event spaces, wellness spa, a gym and exclusive amenities ? outstanding tubs in guestrooms, L'Occitane bath products, and a mobile device that can be carried outside the hotel and used as a map guide as well as a phone. The hotel is surrounded by theatres, cinemas, art galleries, shops and of course, restaurants: Gran Hotel Inglés' gastronomy is purely castiza, meaning 'genuine' in Madrid. Executive chef Willy Moya creates memorable cuisine that links an international menu with surprising Spanish twists at the hotel's premier restaurant LOBO 8. For a lighter fare, enjoy churros and chocolate offered every afternoon or stop by the Lobby Bar for tapas paired with vermouth or a signature cocktail. The hotelás highlight is the Salón de las Letras. Here, there is a modern fireplace and an amazing collection of books, including a series on the famous Spaniard Don Quixote of La Mancha who, as the legend goes, decided to take up his lance and sword to defend the helpless and destroy the wicked. Guests are encouraged to borrow books and learn more about Spain's history and heritage. There have been many distinguished guests who have frequented the five-star hotel, from musicians, singers and painters to politicians and writers, including the late British author Virginia Woolfe. Considered an important modernist of the 20th century, she wrote pioneering essays on artistic theory, literary history, women's writing and the politics of power. The melancholic writer eventually committed suicide by drowning. Today, the room she usually stayed at the Gran Hotel Inglés is the most sought after.